Regiones Cafetaleras

What is the sensory map?

A sensory map is the representation of a set of elements or categories that have been perceived by human senses.

The search for a graphic representation of the elements of coffee began in the early 20th century, when Nobel Prize winners Tadeus Reichstein and Hermann Staudinger managed to identify 13 aromatic components.

Decades later, investigations continued and this number increased to 600. At present, 850 aroma elements are identified, of the around 1000 detected.

The identification of these components allows us to recognize the distinctive characteristics in their profile, such as quality in cup, acidity and balanced flavor, that adjust very well to the microclimates, the temperature and the high altitude of cultivation of the diverse coffee regions of Peru.

What is the importance of a sensory map?

Having a sensory quality map allows a consensus to be reached on the acceptability of the attributes of Peru's specialty coffees, since it represents the flavors, aromas, tastes and textures of each coffee producing region in the country.

This guide also highlights and recognizes the diversity of sensations produced by specialty coffees, through experiences compiled by expert Peruvian tasters.

Scope and considerations for evaluation

Green coffee beans

Organoleptic evaluation 2018 Harvest

Process type:

Washed coffees

SCAA Qualification criteria are used:

a) Preparation:

Maximum 5 secondary defects

b) Moisture::

10 - 12%

c) Quality:

84 pts. in cup, according to SCAA standard

d) Size:

About over screen 15

Methodology

In order to create a sensory map containing accurate and specific information about specialty coffees in Peru, the coffees of the 10 most important producing regions of the country have been analyzed.

The following steps were followed in this study:

1. Surveys

Company Surveys

2. Interviews

In-depth interviews were conducted with tasters who took part in panels in national competitions and in the Cup of Excellence contest.

3. Review

Review of secondary information.

4. Organoleptic evaluation:

The tasters evaluated the coffee in a:
a) physical way / b) sensory way.

5. Descriptive analysis:

Sensory profiles were determined.

6. Comparative analysis:

The different sensory quality profiles for each coffee region were compared.

7. Validation workshop:

The Promotion Committee approved the quality map.

Criteria taken into account for this study:

  • Individual description of the sensory qualities to be evaluated, organized as they appear.
  • Determine the intensity of the special qualities identified in each sample.
  • Performance of overall judgment or according to set of attributes.
  • The moderator facilitates the discussion of the results in an open session, encouraging the tasters to come to an agreement.

Used tools

This is software for coffee producers and producer organizations that want better information management.

It is designed for institutions that need to communicate the quality of their coffee, both within their organization and with their coffee buyers.

Arabica Coffee Gradingel

Specialty Coffee Association of America

Cropster

This is software for coffee producers and producer organizations that want better information management.

It is designed for institutions that need to communicate the quality of their coffee, both within their organization and with their coffee buyers.

Tastify

This is a platform that recreates a visual representation of the taste of coffee. Useful for those involved in this chain. It does not require paper formats and is easy to share.

Scopes and considerations
for evaluation

The sensory analysis that has been performed is based on specialty coffees, which are defined by the Specialty Coffee Association of America (SCAA) as a product with distinctive quality attributes that come from a particular origin, ideal conditions, and the care and effort of the producer. It should also be mentioned that the following aspects have been taken into account in order to carry out this study:

This is how this class of coffees, through their aromas and flavors, displayed the characteristics that make them recognizable and distinctive, according to their region. And the attributes that were identified for the sensory map are: floral, sweet, chocolate, nuts, spices and acidity.

According to the National Federation of Coffee Growers of Colombia, specialty coffees fall into the following categories:

  • Coffees of origin: regional, farm and exotic.
  • Sustainable coffees: certified.
  • Process coffees: according to preferences and / or customer requirements.
  • Variety coffees: geisha, bourbon, caturra, etc.

Region: Piura

The sensory analysis that has been carried out is based on special coffees, which are defined by the Specialty Coffee Association of America (SCAA) as a product with distinctive quality attributes that come from a particular origin, from the conditions ideal, and the care and effort of the producer. Likewise, it should be mentioned that in order to carry out this study, the following aspects have been taken into account:

Features

Grosper Evaluation

Tastify evaluation

Acidity

Acidity is often described as “brightness” when favorable or “sour” when unfavorable.

At its best, acidity contributes to a coffee’s liveliness, sweetness, and freshfruit character and is almost immediately experienced and evaluated when the coffee is first slurped into the mouth. Acidity that is overly intense or dominating may be unpleasant. Excessive acidity may not be appropriate to the flavor profile of the sample. The final score marked on the horizontal tickmark scale should reflect the taster’s perceived quality.

Coffees expected to be high in acidity, such as a Kenya coffee, or coffees expected to be low in acidity, such as a Sumatra coffee, can receive equally high preference scores although their intensity rankings will be quite different.

Balance

Balance is the way in which the various aspects of the sample, such as flavor, aftertaste, acidity and body, work together and complement or contrast with one another.

If the sample is lacking in certain aroma or taste attributes, or if some attributes are overpowering, the balance score reduces.

Clean cup

Clean cup refers to a lack of interfering negative impressions from first ingestion to final aftertaste, a “transparency” of cup..

In evaluating this attribute, the total flavor experience must be observed, from the time of the initial ingestion to final swallowing or expectoration. Any non-coffee like tastes or aromas will disqualify an individual cup. Two points are awarded for each cup displaying the “clean” attribute.

Body

The quality of body is based upon the tactile feeling of the liquid in the mouth, especially as perceived between the tongue and roof of the mouth.

Most samples with heavy body may also receive a high score in terms of quality due to the presence of brew colloids and sucrose. However, some samples with lighter body may also have a pleasant feeling in the mouth.

Coffees expected to be high in body, such as a Sumatra coffee, or coffees expected to be low in body, such as a Mexican coffee, can receive equally high preference scores although their intensity rankings will be quite different.

Sweetness

Sweetness refers to a pleasing fullness of flavor as well as any obvious sweetness. Its perception is the result of the presence of certain carbohydrates.

The opposite of sweetness in this context is sour, astringency, or “green” flavors. This quality may not be directly perceived as in sucrose-laden products such as soft drinks, but will affect other flavor attributes. Two points are awarded for each cup displaying this attribute for a maximum score of 10 points.

Fragrance / aroma

The aromatic aspects include fragrance, which is defined as the smell of the ground coffee when still dry, and aroma, which is the smell of the coffee when infused with hot water.

The taster can evaluate this at three distinct steps: sniffing the grounds placed into the cup before pouring water onto the coffee, sniffing the aromas released while breaking the crust, and sniffing the aromas released as the coffee steeps.

Final score

The final score should reflect the holistically integrated evaluation of the sample (as perceived by the taster).

A sample with many pleasant aspects, but which is not as good as had been hoped, will receive a low score. A coffee that meets the expectations regarding its character and reflects particular and original flavor qualities will be awarded a high score. An exemplary sample displaying preferred characteristics not fully reflected in the score of each attribute may receive an even higher score. This is the moment in which the tasters carry out their personal evaluation.

Aftertaste

Aftertaste is defined as the length of positive flavor (taste and aroma) qualities emanating from the back of the palate and remaining after the coffee is expectorated or swallowed.

If the aftertaste were short or unpleasant, a lower score would be given.

Taste

Flavor represents the coffee’s principal character, the mid-range notes, in between the first impressions given by the coffee’s first aroma and acidity up until its final aftertaste.

It is a combined impression of all the gustatory (taste bud) sensations and retro-nasal aromas that go from the mouth to nose. The score given for flavor should account for the intensity, quality and complexity of its combined taste and aroma, experienced when the coffee is slurped into the mouth vigorously so as to involve the entire palate.

Uniformity

Uniformity refers to consistency of flavor of the different cups of the sample tasted.

If the cups taste different, the rating of this aspect will not be as high. Two points are awarded for each cup displaying this attribute, with a maximum of 10 points if all five cups are the same.

Acidity

Acidity is often described as “brightness” when favorable or “sour” when unfavorable.

At its best, acidity contributes to a coffee’s liveliness, sweetness, and freshfruit character and is almost immediately experienced and evaluated when the coffee is first slurped into the mouth. Acidity that is overly intense or dominating may be unpleasant. Excessive acidity may not be appropriate to the flavor profile of the sample. The final score marked on the horizontal tickmark scale should reflect the taster’s perceived quality.

Coffees expected to be high in acidity, such as a Kenya coffee, or coffees expected to be low in acidity, such as a Sumatra coffee, can receive equally high preference scores although their intensity rankings will be quite different.

Aftertaste

Aftertaste is defined as the length of positive flavor (taste and aroma) qualities emanating from the back of the palate and remaining after the coffee is expectorated or swallowed.

If the aftertaste were short or unpleasant, a lower score would be given.

Balance

Balance is the way in which the various aspects of the sample, such as flavor, aftertaste, acidity and body, work together and complement or contrast with one another.

If the sample is lacking in certain aroma or taste attributes, or if some attributes are overpowering, the balance score reduces.

Body

The quality of body is based upon the tactile feeling of the liquid in the mouth, especially as perceived between the tongue and roof of the mouth.

Most samples with heavy body may also receive a high score in terms of quality due to the presence of brew colloids and sucrose. However, some samples with lighter body may also have a pleasant feeling in the mouth.

Coffees expected to be high in body, such as a Sumatra coffee, or coffees expected to be low in body, such as a Mexican coffee, can receive equally high preference scores although their intensity rankings will be quite different.

Clean cup

Clean cup refers to a lack of interfering negative impressions from first ingestion to final aftertaste, a “transparency” of cup.

In evaluating this attribute, the total flavor experience must be observed, from the time of the initial ingestion to final swallowing or expectoration. Any non-coffee like tastes or aromas will disqualify an individual cup. Two points are awarded for each cup displaying the “clean” attribute.

Final score

The final score should reflect the holistically integrated evaluation of the sample (as perceived by the taster).

A sample with many pleasant aspects, but which is not as good as had been hoped, will receive a low score. A coffee that meets the expectations regarding its character and reflects particular and original flavor qualities will be awarded a high score. An exemplary sample displaying preferred characteristics not fully reflected in the score of each attribute may receive an even higher score. This is the moment in which the tasters carry out their personal evaluation.

Flavor

Flavor represents the coffee’s principal character, the mid-range notes, in between the first impressions given by the coffee’s first aroma and acidity up until its final aftertaste.

It is a combined impression of all the gustatory (taste bud) sensations and retro-nasal aromas that go from the mouth to nose. The score given for flavor should account for the intensity, quality and complexity of its combined taste and aroma, experienced when the coffee is slurped into the mouth vigorously so as to involve the entire palate.

Fragrance / aroma

The aromatic aspects include fragrance, which is defined as the smell of the ground coffee when still dry, and aroma, which is the smell of the coffee when infused with hot water.

The taster can evaluate this at three distinct steps: sniffing the grounds placed into the cup before pouring water onto the coffee, sniffing the aromas released while breaking the crust, and sniffing the aromas released as the coffee steeps.

Sweetness

Sweetness refers to a pleasing fullness of flavor as well as any obvious sweetness. Its perception is the result of the presence of certain carbohydrates.

The opposite of sweetness in this context is sour, astringency, or “green” flavors. This quality may not be directly perceived as in sucrose-laden products such as soft drinks, but will affect other flavor attributes. Two points are awarded for each cup displaying this attribute for a maximum score of 10 points.

Uniformity

Uniformity refers to consistency of flavor of the different cups of the sample tasted.

If the cups taste different, the rating of this aspect will not be as high. Two points are awarded for each cup displaying this attribute, with a maximum of 10 points if all five cups are the same.

The sensory map in coffee-growing regions

Methodology and creation of a sensory map

Also discover:

Methodology

Scope

Tools used

Results

Discover the regions that are part of this evaluation

Glossary

What is the sensory map?

Methodology

Results

Glossary